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Category — Friday Blog Roundup

609th Friday Blog Roundup

The twins now have a locker.  Well, they each have their own locker.  This is a big step up from elementary school when all they had was a desk and a cubby.  Both have a few issues opening said lockers.

But that’s not the point.  The point is that it is very important that we decorate said locker within an inch of its life.  I’ve been tucking away comic books and ripping pictures from People magazine all summer that they can use to wallpaper the walls.  And I’m getting each a dry erase board so they can write themselves important notes.  (But which I know they’ll use to write song lyrics and ridiculous things from autocorrect.)

Here’s the memory I have from middle school/high school, and I’m not sure kids still do this: Did you decorate your friends’ lockers for their birthday?  I remember that after you left school the day before your birthday, your friends stayed behind and filled your locker with streamers and balloons and candy.  If you had a summer birthday, people usually did it during your half-birthday.  Was this a thing where you lived?

I told the kids I needed their locker combo so I could surprise them with something like that one day because I wasn’t sure kids did that anymore.  And it was always the best feeling to open that metal door and have tiny balloons fall out on you.  Though they pointed out that if no one did this anymore, it would look a little weird.  Are kids still doing this these days?

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

  • None… sniff

Okay, now my choices this week.

Res Cogitatae has a post about worrying that struck close to home.  She worries about a potential non-problem (she just doesn’t know yet) because it’s a situation that has a solution, and it distracts her from the very real problems that currently exist that do not have solutions.  It’s also a post about what it’s like to parent a second child.  Just a really really good read about how we’re all individuals, but there are clearly commonalities, too.

Dear Noah has a post about the fact that had Noah lived, he would have been starting preschool.  She writes, “Owen’s school is incredibly full.  There are wait lists for every class but one.  The one that Noah would have been in.  His spot is there.  But he isn’t.”  Please go over and give her a hug.

Lastly, Riding the IVF Roller Coaster is back with an update.  She muses about whether she should change the title now that she’s not doing IVF, but IVF is still a lens through which she sees the world.  She writes, “I think I’ve been living less deliberately than I should. I’ve been trying to keep my head above water for so long that I’ve come to consider treading water OK.”  As a fellow water treader, I want to start swimming again, too.

The roundup to the Roundup: Did people decorate your locker for your birthday?  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between August 19th and 26th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

August 26, 2016   9 Comments

608th Friday Blog Roundup

The kids and I jumped back in the car this week and returned to the beach on our own. Josh stayed home with Truman, though the hotel staff seemed genuinely sad that we didn’t bring him along and asked about him.  Truman, I mean.  Sorry, Josh.

We spent a few days eating junk food… I mean truly junk food.  Like you would be horrified if I told you what we ate for three days.  The twins swam in the ocean for six hours while I stood in thigh-high water and watched them.  We read Mockingjay aloud on the beach and browsed books in the bookstore and stayed up late each night watching Olympics.  We went biking one morning to balance out the extreme amount of junk food we ate.  (Did I mention that it was grotesque, the junk food consumption?)  We mused about what happened to the settlement at Roanoke Island and watched several families of dolphin jump out of the water while they moved across the shore.

It was really hard to leave.  We’ll go back a few times this fall and winter, but the last trip of summer is always hard.  I feel so much a part of the town even though I’m an outsider.  I’m a part of it because my heart so badly wants to be a part of it.  I can visit there and get by for a bit — many of the townspeople know us by name and greet us as if we’re one of them.  But they know and I know that I’m not really one of them.  They belong and I do not.  And it breaks my heart every time I have to cross over the bridge, the light bouncing off the salt marsh.

chincoteague, va

I think I’m a little down that summer is almost over.  Actually, I don’t just think it.  I am.

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

Okay, now my choices this week.

Laughing IS Conceivable has a funny (and true) post about trying to talk to an infertile woman.  I laughed aloud with this: “I, for one, was always a ticking emotional time bomb. The only times I wasn’t ticking was when I actually exploded all over somebody. Then I reset the timer.”  Go over and read the whole thing.

Empty Arms, Broken Heart has a post about following bloggers’ stories that summed up what I love about blogs, this community, and the wistfulness I feel when a name pops up who hasn’t posted in a while and I wonder how they are.  She writes, “Parenting after infertility is a unique voice. Those who stick around know there is always more to tell. And I look forward to following along.”

Lastly, Magpie Musings has an important post about the idea of going to funerals.  Why you should go, and when you can’t go, send a condolence card.  She writes, “Honestly – get out a card, or your good writing paper, and a pen, and write two or five sentences, and put it in the mail with a live stamp on it. It is the least that you can do, and in my book, it’s acceptable if you have never met your imaginary friend’s father or your casual acquaintance’s sister.”  It’s one of those posts that I will always think about when I hear that someone has died.  Because she’s right.  Go to the funeral or send the card.

The roundup to the Roundup: Last beach trip of the summer.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between August 12th and 19th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

August 19, 2016   7 Comments

607th Friday Blog Roundup

The twins and I have started reading The Cursed Child.  It took us a few days because we had other stuff on the to-do list that had to get done.  But now we’re chugging through it.

We had a few read-aloud methods we considered beforehand since we wanted it to be a one-woman show.  At first I thought I would place pieces of paper on the floor with each character’s name, and then stand on the correct piece of paper when I was speaking for that character.

But in the end, either due to laziness because moving from paper to paper started to sound less and less appealing or because it was going to take too long to shuffle through the papers and lay out each scene’s papers, I decided to read the character’s name aloud before saying their line.  So name (said in a normal voice) + lines (said with feeling).

I bawled reading the opening scene.  I know it’s just a repeat of what is already in the seventh book, but it’s a reunion.  I’ve missed these characters so much.

But I’ve got some strong feelings about some of the passages.  I’m going to write it up in a post and put a spoiler message at the top.  Skip it next week if you haven’t yet read the book.  Or bookmark it for the future.  But… yeah… there is no way to talk about some of it without mentioning spoilers.  Sorry.

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

Okay, now my choices this week.

Mom PharmD looks at the bright side of nearing the end of family building attempts: no more vitamins.  As she goes toward a final attempt to add a third child to their family, she also sets a loose end date to the process.  It is, as she says, the only way to ensure that she doesn’t remain in infertility limbo.  It’s a tiny post about being okay with the end, whatever that ending may be.

In Quest of a Binky Moongee has a post about another facet of infertility: the age gaps that exist between people.  She writes about her 18-year-old niece, about the joy of being her aunt and watching her age.  But in that aging is another fact: “She is only a couple of hours away for college but it seems almost impossible for her to get to know my future child(ren) like the way she knows her little cousins because of all the time they have spent together.  My child(ren) will not know their oldest cousin the way I would want them to if they had been born a few years earlier and growing up in the same town together.”  It is just food for thought; one more thing infertility takes.

Lastly, for anyone who has followed the enormous love I have for Truman, it’s no wonder that Searching for Our Silver Lining’s post about quantifying love hit home.  She writes, “We encourage all types of love, make no mistake. But when one half of that relationship is suddenly gone, either through death or the relationship ending, grief is immediately quantified based on the type of love.”  She admits that while we can rationally say that the type of love we have for various people or animals is different, that one type of love does not trump another.  Love is love is love.

The roundup to the Roundup: How to read The Cursed Child aloud.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between August 5th and 12th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

August 12, 2016   8 Comments

606th Friday Blog Roundup

The Olympics start tonight.  I have big plans to spend the evening in my pyjamas in front of the television.  I love the parade of countries when the teams walk in, waving their flags.  And the lighting of the Olympic flame.  I’m just really excited about the broadcast.

But.

Is it my imagination, or could you see many more events during the primetime hours when we were kids?  I feel like almost every activity was televised in part during the evening vs. now where they show the most popular sports at night — swimming, gymnastics, track — and stick the less mainstream sports — fencing, rugby sevens, judo — on random stations during the day.  Because I distinctly remember seeing things like synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics when I was a kid, but sports like that aren’t hitting primetime coverage.

Am I right?

And are you watching, too?

*******

Uh… before you dive into posts… follow Persnickety Chickadee’s link and find out your magical job.  I got wandmaker!  A real, live wandmaker!  I’m magic!

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

  • None… sniff.

Okay, now my choices this week.

Different Shores has a post about people saying that being a mother is the best thing, usually a saying uttered by celebrities, as in, “My 55 Oscars are all meaningless next to my children.  Being a mother is the best thing in the world, and I would give up acting in a heartbeat.”  It’s not only an interesting post, but the comment section is jumping with conversation.  Go over and give your thoughts.

Bent Not Broken has a post about her husband connecting with another childless-after-infertility man.  She explains why this moment was important: “I found people I trusted and who I could share the good, the bad, and the ugly with.  Hubs never found that.”  It’s about those moments when you meet up with a “me, too” and it opens up something inside of you.

Lastly, a beautiful and moving post from Endlessness That You Fear about how her hands aren’t quite as full anymore after the loss of her son.  She writes, “So back then, my hands were full … Yesterday morning, someone held the front door of the daycare for me and said that I had my hands full. I just gave a half smile. They should have seen me before.”  Go over and give her support.

The roundup to the Roundup: Olympics starts tonight!  Woohoo!  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between July 29th and August 5th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

August 5, 2016   6 Comments

605th Friday Blog Roundup

When the state of the world and the churning hate being pumped into the atmosphere are bringing you down, there is only one way to combat the negative: Purchase a copy of Steel Magnolias.

I talked the ChickieNob into watching it with me this week. She has grown up hearing me quote this movie all the time, so she sort of knew all the characters before it began. She loved it despite trying hard to hold the movie at arm’s length.

That movie (and the play, too) are sort of like Hallmark cards.  You know how most of the time, you just pick a card that feels pretty much on-target?  That’s other movies.  But Steel Magnolias is like finding the perfect card that says exactly what you’re trying to say but can’t put into words.

I love this movie so much.  I love its take on female friendships and mother-daughter relationships and the ways we grow and change.  I love that it can still make me cry, every single time.  I love that it says everything I want to say about the strength of women.

I’m keeping it on my phone for the time being.  Whenever the negativity starts bringing me down, I will queue it up and watch five minutes of M’Lynn and Ouiser and feel better about the world.

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

Okay, now my choices this week.

Wild and Precious Life has a moving post about leaving her house and moving far away.  This is where she lived when her lost children were conceived, and where she lived when they died.  The space contains all those memories and serves as a tangible tie to S and G.  My throat tightened up reading the listing of memories.  She writes, “Where R and my sister and I laid in a jumble and passed out the day after my month in the hospital was over and our babies were really and forever gone.”

You must read A Woman My Age’s post about race and being a black woman.  “I’ve been raised to keep my mouth shut and avoid conflict.  Whether that’s because I’m female or because I’m a black female, it doesn’t matter.  Dress nice, speak nicely and keep money in your pocket or otherwise they will think you’re stealing.  That’s what my mother taught me.  And unconsciously, I’ve been training my son to do the same.”  It is such a powerful, powerful post.

Lastly, No Baby Ruth has a follow up after her MTHFR diagnosis.  While it’s good that she knows that she’s homozygous for C677T because it can affect more than fertility, she feels the weight of the diagnosis and wonders if she has it in her to continue on this family building path.  Again, for anyone who thinks getting a diagnosis makes things straightforward and simple, this post becomes a must-read so they can think again.

The roundup to the Roundup: Steel Magnolias is sometimes all you need.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between July 22nd and July 29th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

July 29, 2016   9 Comments

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