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Category — Friday Blog Roundup

655th Friday Blog Roundup

I try not to brag about the kids, but this is an accomplishment that affects everyone on earth. The robot the Wolvog designed beat up all the other robots in the robot-fighting ring. His robot was the victor in the robot death match.

Now you may wonder how that affects you. Well, people, when the robots take over the world (and you know that they’re going to take over the world), my son can invent and program a robot that can beat up the bad robots. (Unless, of course, he uses his power for evil and designs the bad robots that take over the world.) So we’re totally safe.  (Unless we’re not safe because he designed the bad robots.)

I told him that I was proud of him because he could protect me from the “toasters” (as they say on Battlestar Galactica) in the same way that he protects Mommy’s face from stray baseballs when we’re at Nationals Park. (Yes, I actually ask my son to wear a mitt so he can catch baseballs that may knock me unconscious. You can never be too safe.) He rolled his eyes and muttered, “That’s not the way things work.”

I have zero clue what that means because this is exactly the way things work. Four teams made robots. Four teams set their robots in a ring and had them fight to the death. Three robots were destroyed by one robot. My kid’s robot. I promise, he has our back and will protect all of us. Unless he doesn’t.

He was particularly tween-ish when I told him that I was letting everyone know that he could save us.  He rolled his eyes and said, “If you must.”  Which I like to think means, “Oooh, I’m so excited to have everyone know that I made a good fighting robot” in teen-speak.

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

Okay, now my choices this week.

Lavender Luz has an update about a situation she discussed on her blog last year.  An adoptive mother was talking about her adult son moving close to his biological family so he could get to know them better.  A year later, the woman reflects on the experience.  I love when people come back and let you know how things turned out.

Raven Rambling writes about a hard conversation she started with her husband, but once the words were spoken, she learned that he felt the same way.  It’s a post about what you hope happens when you speak your heart — that you are not only understood, but you learn something about the other person, too.

Lastly, River Run Dry has a post about the experiences that shaped her into the person she is now, and how she’ll never know the roads not taken; the person she would have become if life had not unfolded as it did.  It’s really a post about the weight of our relationships; they’re strong enough to pull us in a new direction.

The roundup to the Roundup: The Wolvog will save us from the bad robots.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between July 14th and 21st) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

July 21, 2017   7 Comments

654th Friday Blog Roundup

Skip this section if you get queasy easily.

We were at dinner before heading to a carnival and somehow the topic of people vomiting on rides came up.  “I’m sure it’s very rare,” I reassured the twins.  “I’ve never seen someone vomit on a ride.”

Well, friends, I needed to take back that statement because about a half hour later, at the carnival, I watched a man vomit from the paratrooper ride.  Again and again and again.

We did not go on the paratrooper ride after that.  (Well, I wasn’t going to go on at all, so it’s more accurate to say that everyone else didn’t go on the paratrooper ride.)

I love amusement parks, but I realized that I don’t really love carnivals.  Isn’t that odd?  I mean, they’re sort of the same thing: rides, games, entertainment.  But while I love it when it is permanently cemented into the earth, I’m not quite as fond of it when it can be packed up and carted away to the next fairground.

Does your brain make a difference between carnivals and amusement parks?

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

Okay, now my choices this week.

Inconceivable! has a post about storks (like the actual bird) and omens.  It is a gorgeous post that contains this thought: “When I was first diagnosed with infertility, the one thing I wanted to know was whether or not the acute distress of not knowing and the horrible limbo of waiting would ever end.”  It’s about not being resolved but seeing the possible paths forward.

A Woman My Age has a post about adoptive parenting.  Her son’s birthmother wants her address because she wants to send a gift, and it opens up confused feelings because the longstanding relationship is changing and they’re navigating other situations.  She states: “I knew I could not fully control things and I think that was bit of an issue for me. It reminded me of opening up my life to infertility doctors and social workers.”  It’s about trying to figure out parenting after adoption when there are not clear, concrete, perfect answers.  It’s about writing your own parenting manual; being your own guide.

Lastly, No Kidding in NZ has a post about acceptance that stems from a very cool idea.  She writes, “I think I’m going to go through my blog here, from the very beginning, and reblog, or update, some posts.”  So we write things in the moment, but how many of us go back and update or blog again about the situation with the gift of retrospection?  I, for one, am really excited to read what she writes.

The roundup to the Roundup: Carnivals vs. amusement parks.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between July 7th and 14th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

July 14, 2017   12 Comments

653rd Friday Blog Roundup

I cracked up through Joanna Rothkopf’s piece in the New York Times about exacting revenge in creative ways.  She explains reading Dante’s Inferno and the idea of contrapasso:

While reading the book, terrified and exhilarated, I filled my evenings with grotesque fantasies of the punishments I might receive for my unchecked narcissism and offensive beauty. That is, until I remembered that “Inferno” was fiction and that hell was just an invention, designed to make people fear the consequences of their actions, as well as to comfort those who had been wronged without justice.

So she instead points out the ways she seeks revenge in the here and now, including punishing people who try to skip the line in Starbucks by remaining in front of them and then ordering something complicated veeeeeery veeeeeeery slowly.

But I really love the end thought:

Besides, doesn’t every decision ultimately originate at that same intersection of selfishness and altruism, exactly like that summer service trip I chose to take, looking at once to learn about the injustices of the world and to make out with boys? Aren’t we all a combination of totally horrible and vaguely heroic?

Aren’t we?

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

Okay, now my choices this week.

Inexplicably Missing has a post about her mood changing during transfer day.  She realized that hearing the negative side of things (rather than focusing on the positive) was changing her experience with her cycle.  But before she could let the doctor know that she wanted to focus on what was positive about the blastocyst they were transferring, she heard bad news mixed in with the good.  She writes, “So yet again, I left the transfer feeling somewhat deflated. This sucks because in reality, having even just one blastocyst to transfer is a good thing.”

My Path to Mommyhood has a post about a friend getting the adoption agency call and processing her own feelings about being happy for someone else while being sad for herself.  She admits: “It’s a hard balance, this happy-sad dichotomy. I am not any less confident in our decision, and I know that the little voice is the most unhelpful bitch ever. I know we did what was right for us. It’s just so hard to see (and feel) this contrast at this particular moment in time.”

Lastly, A+ Effort has a story about an incident at a museum.  She tells the story in the form of a letter to the museum, pointing out: “I don’t know the volunteer’s name and wouldn’t presume to assign a motivation to his actions, but the impression he gave was that the rules are selectively enforced on the basis of race.”  But it’s the follow-up to the letter, the discussion of privilege extension that gave food for thought.

The roundup to the Roundup: Revenge creativity.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between June 30th and July 7th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

July 7, 2017   3 Comments

652nd Friday Blog Roundup

I’ve been trying to convince the kids that when adults get together, we like to put on a record and dance in the middle of the living room, mostly doing the robot.  The reason they have never witnessed this is that adults would never engage in this behaviour if there were children around.  But yes, the moment they are out of the house, or when I go over to another person’s house, we’re dancing in the living room.  Or the kitchen.  I mean, we aren’t picky.  We’ll just all gather in a group and do the robot for hours at a time.  And then laugh and laugh and laugh.

Do you realize how much brain power I use trying to annoy the twins?

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

  • None… sniff.

Okay, now my choices this week.

Battlefish is back with a post after a long winter.  She talks about the depression that caused her absence: “It wasn’t like this every single day, but most days (even now still to some extent) I was able to get by without thinking about anything and it would be an okay day. And then there were days it would just all crash in on me.”  It made me smile when I saw a post pop up in my rss reader, and reading it felt like a fragile thaw.  Like a corner has been turned, or, at least, someone has peeked their head around.

No Kidding in NZ tells readers to stop apologizing for the fact that they don’t have children.  She points out, “But our existence is not offensive, our No Kidding lives are not discourteous to any others, and therefore having increased visibility as people without children – talking about the fact we have no children, whether in a casual one-line comment, or in response to others, whether correcting assumptions, or by refusing to justify our lives or respond to invasive questions – is not impolite either.”  I love the ending, and if we were in a movie, I would have been standing up and cheering while she walked by in slow motion.

Infertility Honesty has a post about coming out of the grieving stage and moving into the overlapping rebuilding stage.  She is simultaneously dealing with a nervous system disorder, but she writes, “My mind then did something it has rarely been able to do for the past seven years, it skipped around the meadow of possible endings and transitions.”  And I love this: “My losses and experiences will always be a part of me, in need of being tended to and integrated into my life, but perhaps there does come a time when the foundation is built, the legwork not so extensive.”  It’s a gorgeous post.

Res Cogitatae has a moving post about visiting a beach for the first time since her father’s accident that left him paralyzed.  But it’s really about what we carry with us due to our life experiences, the unique struggles we each have based on what we know first hand.  She writes, “One day my children will not want to swim in the rock pool. They will want to dive into the waves, just like their father, just like I once did. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to do it again.”

Lastly, Jewish IVF has a post about how she feels differently about things this week.  It’s not one thing, but it’s several things all coming together; feeling like she’s taking care of items on her to-do list, setting and respecting her own boundaries, pushing herself to join with things.  She tries to explain her feelings at a baby naming ceremony: “It was beautiful and I felt overwhelmed but not so much that I had to run out. Or cry. It was encouraging rather than not. I’m not sure I can explain it.”  I think it’s encouraging because you realize that you’ve gotten through something. That you endured.  And that’s not a small thing.

The roundup to the Roundup: Bothering the twins.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between June 23rd and 30th) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

June 30, 2017   6 Comments

651st Friday Blog Roundup

I am not normally (1) a napper or (2) into crystals, but I want to take a nap on a $75/half hour crystal bed.  I want to awaken in a perfect state by lying down on what amounts to “a baby bouncer for adults.”  I could do without a pine-scented eye mask — I really don’t like the smell of pine needles — but if they had one that was the scent of sunscreen?  And the sounds were beach sounds?  And the cost wasn’t $75?  I would be all over that.

Maybe I just want a nap.  Period.  I am feeling really burned out and could use a few hours of down time.

Which makes it sound like that old commercial for Polly-o string cheese.  I want a nap on a crystal bed.  But hold the pine-scented mask.  And hold the vibrating crystals.  Hey, Jimmy, give this girl a nap with nothing.  Nuttin’?

Yeah, like just a nap.

*******

Stop procrastinating.  Go make your backups.  Don’t have regrets.

Seriously.  Stop what you’re doing for a moment.  It will take you fifteen minutes, tops.  But you will have peace of mind for days and days.  It’s the gift to yourself that keeps on giving.

As always, add any new thoughts to the Friday Backup post and peruse new comments in order to find out about methods, plug-ins, and devices that help you quickly back up your data and accounts.

*******

And now the blogs…

But first, second helpings of the posts that appeared in the open comment thread last week.  In order to read the description before clicking over, please return to the open thread:

  • None… sniff.

Okay, now my choices this week.

No Kidding in NZ has a post about Mother’s Day (and by extension, Father’s Day).  She writes, “There was, of course, the usual onslaught on social media, as there is today for Father’s Day, where the curse of social media is that people seem to place importance on being seen to recognise their parents or partners. I will admit that I was a bit fed up that my normal feeds this morning were clogged up with northern hemisphere people cheerfully wishing their fathers or husbands a good day, and even resented* those people who tagged on wishes for ‘those who find today hard,’ and wondered why, if they acknowledge that today is hard for some people, do they post about it at all?”  Additionally, in a world that marks the same idea on different days on the calendar, social media means you’re living it again and again and again.

My Path to Mommyhood writes about telling people that she’s not adopting.  She’s doing it slowly, and she’s doing it with a lot of justification, feeling like she needs to explain their decision to stop their family building plans.  In trying to protect her heart, she’s causing herself more stress.  The fact is, she shouldn’t have to protect her heart.  Her heart is already raw; it’s up to the rest of the world to just lean in and hug.

The Road Less Travelled is my Canadian twin.  She has a post about splurging for better seats on an airplane, and I nodded through the whole post.  It pains me to needlessly spend money, and I’m fairly bitter about air travel, but I agree wholeheartedly: “We didn’t get the child we wanted so much — but we CAN have some of those little luxuries that make life more fun and pleasant. So why not?  Life is short… pay for the preferred seat!”  Good advice.

Lastly, Non Sequitur Chica has a post about diversity that was a perfect parenting moment of kids not following the script.  I will probably spend the rest of the day humming, “Hi ho the deerio we all have different skin” to myself.  It’s hard work and it’s important work, but talking about big ideas doesn’t always go as smoothly as you hope.

The roundup to the Roundup: Give me a nap with nuttin’.  Your weekly backup nudge.  And lots of great posts to read.  So what did you find this week?  Please use a permalink to the blog post (written between June 16th and 23rd) and not the blog’s main url. Not understanding why I’m asking you what you found this week?  Read the original open thread post here.

June 23, 2017   8 Comments

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